1. tastefullyoffensive:

    Ladypug [x]

    To think, I almost scrolled past this!

     

  2. You can’t come out of drama school and think, ‘It’s all going to be amazing.’ You have to expect to work in a bar for at least five years and be a waitress for maybe two!

    (Source: emclarkedaily, via gameofthronesdaily)

     

  3. dubdobdee:

    crass
    kim wilde

    the world is no longer this shape

    (via tomewing)

     

  4. onlylolgifs:

    Leaf Blower Dog

    Attack The Block

    (via the-absolute-funniest-posts)

     

  5. lonepilgrim:

    moosefeels:

    believersneverdie5:

    FUCK YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES

    fuck oH MY GOD INHUMANS MOVIE OH MY GOD OH MY GOD YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YAS YEA SYASYEAY EYA YES

    my life has a purpose

    It’s Marvel’s world; we just happen to live in it.

    (Source: thatmovieguydoe)

     

  6.  

  7. glittercalum:

    glittercalum:

    THE JAMES BOND HEADCANON IS SO STRONG

    JESUS CHRIST

    ARE YOU ALL HAPPY NOW

    Er, guys...

    (Source: prettyboystyles, via isabelthespy)

     


  8. TEST…

    "Ya-Ta!"

     

  9. ‘Bug Powder Dust’ by Bomb the Bass
    Burroughsian Hip Hop via @Mozfan…and why not?

     

  10. stunningpicture:

    The days news, in one photo

    (via fornicake)

     


  11. A few years ago in Toronto, I attended a screening, in a packed auditorium, of a horror movie called Hell Night (1981), one of the innumerable progeny of Halloween (1978) and Friday the 13th (1980). The film itself was about as uninteresting as it is possible for a cultural product to be: the audience, which consisted largely of teenagers, was remarkable. It became obvious at a very early stage that every spectator knew exactly what the film was going to do at every point, even down to the order in which it would dispose of its various characters, and the screening was accompanied by something in the nature of a running commentary in which each dramatic move was excitedly broadcast some minutes before it was actually made. The film’s total predictability did not create boredom or disappointment. On the contrary, the predictability was clearly the main source of pleasure, and the only occasion for disappointment would have been a modulation of the formula, not the repetition of it. Everyone had parted with his/her four bucks in the complete confidence that Hell Night was a known quantity and that it would do nothing essentially different form any of its predecessors. Everyone could guess what would happen, and it did happen. In the course of the evening, art had shrunk to its first cause, and on coming out of the theater, I had the incongruous sense of having been invited to participate in communion.
    — Andrew Britton, “Blissing Out: The Politics of Reaganite Entertainment” (Movie 31/32, winter 1986). Reprinted in Britton on Film: The Complete Film Criticism of Andrew Britton (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2008), p. 96-154.  (via thediscography)
     

  12. Is that Martin Scorsese in the black t-shirt?

    (Source: real-hiphophead, via animeandfilmotaku)

     

  13.  

  14. gameofthronesdaily:

    Emilia Clarke for Marie Claire, May 2014

    (via stormbornvalkyrie)

     


  15. anti-propaganda:

    "Michael S. Wilson: You are, among many other things, a self-described anarchist — an anarcho-syndicalist, specifically.  Most people think of anarchists as disenfranchised punks throwing rocks at store windows, or masked men tossing ball-shaped bombs at fat industrialists.  Is this an accurate view?  What is anarchy to you?

    Noam Chomsky: Well, anarchism is, in my view, basically a kind of tendency in human thought which shows up in different forms in different circumstances, and has some leading characteristics.  Primarily it is a tendency that is suspicious and skeptical of domination, authority, and hierarchy.  It seeks structures of hierarchy and domination in human life over the whole range, extending from, say, patriarchal families to, say, imperial systems, and it asks whether those systems are justified.  It assumes that the burden of proof for anyone in a position of power and authority lies on them.  Their authority is not self-justifying.  They have to give a reason for it, a justification.  And if they can’t justify that authority and power and control, which is the usual case, then the authority ought to be dismantled and replaced by something more free and just.  And, as I understand it, anarchy is just that tendency.  It takes different forms at different times.”

    I’m leaning closer to this way of thinking, day by day.

     
Tweets by @Simonhooper